Electric Chicken Fly Step-by-Step

Electric Chicken Fly Step-by-Step:

Fishermen, or at least Fishing Lure marketing firms, have always been creative when it comes to naming new color variations for our favorite lures and flies. “Fire Tiger” crankbaits have been in the conventional angler’s box since I was a child. And for a brief while in my youth, the eloquently named “Brass Monkey Puke” was my grandfather’s go-to spoon color while trolling the finger lakes of Upstate New York.

Closer to home, the world of soft plastic baits has taken the reins with regards to “innovative” naming. Each year a new hot color combo hits the market with a clever new name, and, every once in a blue moon, they stick.

Such was the case with the Chartreuse and Pink combo known as “Electric Chicken.” A combination so effective that South Carolina guide Jack Brown’s fly rod adaptation has maintained the same name. Tied with dumbell eyes to impart a jigging action, this fly has proven effective on inshore species as its plastic counterpart.


Materials:
Gamakatsu SS15 (#1-2/0) 140 Denier (Flo. Pink)Materials Zonker Strip (Chartreuse)
Materials Ice Chenille (Pink)Materials Krystal Flash (Pearl) Dumbell Eyes (Medium; Black)
Materials Monofilament (50 lbs)

Electric Chicken Fly Step-by-Step Tying Instructions:

(Mobile Viewers: Click images to enlarge)


Tips and Tricks

  1. What’s in a name? Or color for that matter? – While this flies name may seem to dictate color selection, don’t let that hold you back. Variations on this pattern exist under a variety of monikers with popular colors including more subdued tan and rust. While the wild colors above may do the trick some days, it doesn’t hurt to have a more natural version on hand. Just in case.

Proof of Concept

I tied this pattern on early on day 2 of a recent trip to the Marsh. Perhaps half a dozen casts later, the fish to the left came to hand. Three or four others followed shortly thereafter as did a trout the following day.

Tight Lines!

-Chris

Species Caught on the Electric Chicken Fly to Date:
  1. Redfish
  2. Spotted Seatrout


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